Friday, 1 November 2013

FAQ: How do your books "integrate" with your courses?

Dear Alan
I'd like to embark on learning from your books and online course but should I do one before the other? Or does one set of materials supersede another?
Thanks, 
A Correspondent 
I receive this question often enough that I'm going to try and answer it fully on the blog.

On a timeline, I created the following products:
If you still want to learn Selenium-RC using Java then the Selenium Simplified Book is the one to get. I walk you through learning the basics of Java, setting up the environments and Selenium-RC in a single book. In my mind the WebDriver courses and Java For Testers, supersede  the Selenium Simplified Book, but if you want to use Selenium-RC then the book remains valid, but remember Selenium-RC has been deprecated in favour of WebDriver.

Feedback I received on the Selenium Simplified book suggested that it was overly oriented to the beginner. Many people already knew how to code and setup the tools, and they just wanted to learn the API.
So, for Selenium WebDriver I created 3 products:
If you don't know how to code, but are a self starter and can learn from online resources when you get started, I recommend:
If you know you're going to need help working through the API then

And since it seemed top heavy on Automation, when that only represents part of what I do in my daily work life, I created the Technical Web Testing 101 online course to introduce people to the tools and thought processes I use when testing Web Applications.

I created  Java For Testers independently of Selenium 2 WebDriver Basics online Course. I use much of the Java in Java For Testers, on the WebDriver course, but don't explain the use of the Java constructs in detail.
I think they complement each other rather than directly overlap or supersede each other. Java For Testers is designed as a stand alone introduction to Java Programming and the WebDriver course doesn't spend a lot of time explaining the Java used.

Hope that helps. And "Thank You" to the most recent set of correspondents that asked the question.

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