Monday, 17 February 2014

Back to Basics: How to use the Windows Command Line

Those of us that have worked with computers for most of our lives, take the command line for granted. We know it exists, we know basically how to use it, and we know how to find the commands we need even if we can't remember them.

But, not everyone knows how to use the command line. I've had quite a few questions on the various courses I conduct because people have no familiarity with the command line. And the worst part was, I could not find a good resource to send them to, in order to learn the command line.

As a result, I created a short 6 minute video that shows how to start the windows command line, change to a specific directory, run some commands, and how to find out more information.



Start Command line by:
  • clicking on start \ "Command Prompt"
  • Start \ Run, "cmd"
  • Start \ search for "cmd"
  • Win+R, "cmd"
  • Windows Powertoy "Open Command Window Here"
  • Shift + Right Click - "Open Command Prompt Here"
  • type "cmd" in explorer (Win+e, navigate, "cmd")     
  • Windows 8 command from dashboard
Change to a directory using "cd /d " then copy and paste the absolute path from Windows Explorer.

Basic Commands:
  • dir - show directory listing
  • cd .. - move up a directory
  • cd directoryname  - change to a subdirectory
  • cls - clear the screen
  • title name - retitle a command window
  • help - what commands are available
  • help command - information on the command

If anyone wants more videos like this then please either leave comments here, or on YouTube and let me know. Or if you know of any great references to point beginners at then I welcome those comments as well.

Thursday, 13 February 2014

Introducing Virtualbox modern.ie Turnkey Virtual Machines for Web Testing

My install of VirtualBox prompted me to update today. And I realised that I hadn't written much about VirtualBox, and I find any videos I had created about it.

Which surprised me since I use Virtual Machines. A lot.


No Matter, since I created the above video today.

In it, I show the basic install process for VirtualBox. A free Virtualisation platform from Oracle which runs on Windows, Mac and Linux.

Also, Modern.IE, which I know I have mentioned before. The Microsoft site where you can download virtual machines for each version of MS Windows - XP through to Windows 8, with a variety of IE versions.

Perfect for 'compatibility' testing - the main use case I think Microsoft envisioned for the site. Or for creating sandbox environments and for running automation against different browsers, which I often use it to do.

I even mention TurnkeyLinux, where you can find pre-built virtual machines for numerous open source tools.

In fact the version of RedMine that I used on the Black Ops Testing Workshops to demonstrate the quick automation I created. I installed via a TurnkeyLinux virtual machine.

Oracle, even host a set of pre-built virtual machines.

A New Feature in VirtualBox (that I only noticed today)

I noticed some functionality had crept in to VirtualBox today.

The cool 'Seamless Mode' which I had previously noticed in Parallels on the Mac (as 'Coherence' mode) and on VM Fusion on the Mac called ('Unity' mode). This allows 'windows' on the virtual machine to run as though they were 'normal' windows on your machine - so not contrained within the virtual machine window.

I love this feature. It means I no longer have to keep switching in and out of a VM Window and can run the virtualised apps alongside native apps. And with shared clipboard and drag and drop, it seems too easy to forget that I ran the app from a VM.

If you haven't tried this yet. Download VirtualBox, install the Win XP with IE6 VM, and then run it in 'Seamless' Mode so you have IE6 running on the desktop of your shiny whiz bang monster desktop. Try it. Testing with IE6 becomes a fun thing to do - how often do you hear that?



Thursday, 6 February 2014

How to emulate mobile devices using Chrome browser

Google Chrome continually changes, which usually means good news as new features appear. Unfortunately sometimes it means changes to our existing workflow.
This happened recently when Google released a new version of Chrome, but moved the Emulator settings.
I eventually found them, and show you how in the video below:

Or for those of you that prefer to read, read on. I've added references at the bottom.
We have to start by using the Overrides in the Chrome developer tools settings. All the emulation used to exist here, but it has moved.
Right click, and Inspect, to show the developer tools. Then click the cog on the right to show the Settings. And show the Override settings.
So the first thing we do is make sure that we have checked "Show 'Emulation' view in console drawer".
Great.
So now where is the console drawer?
Close the settings and in the dev tools on any of these tabs, we can display the "Console drawer" by pressing the escape key, and lo the drawer did appear and an emulation tab was present.
And we can use the emulation tab to help us test.
In the demo video I show this in action on the bbc site.
Choose a device to emulate. I pick the "Samsung Galaxy Note II" because I have a physical device for that on my desk, and if I encounter any issues I can try the same functionality on my device.
Choose Device, Click Emulate, and you can see the screen size refreshes to a scaled smaller size.
You can amend the display settings using the 'Screen' options. By default it is shown scaled, but you can make if full size if you want.
But we still don't have the mobile site yet. So I refresh the screen. Using Ctrl+F5. And because Chrome is now sending the correct mobile headers for the Note II, we are directed to the Mobile site.
And now the issues.
I try and use the site. Click on the links. And nothing happens.
So, I change sensors and switch off the emulate touch screen. And we have a working site again.
This works on the Note, so it might be a BBC issue, or it might be a Chrome issue. But really it shows us the problems of testing through emulation, when we find suspected issues, we have to replicate them on a better emulator or a physical device.
But the Chrome emulation is so convenient on the desktop that for a first run check on the site, and certainly checking how your server responds to mobile headers, these are a great first step.
And you can stop the emulation by clicking the [Reset] button.
In the video I show a bonus, which I thought was an emulator bug, but seems to be by design by the BBC, where the Weather page does not redirect.
Chrome emulation? Very easy way to run a first check on the site, if you know how to access the functionality.
Additional References:
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